Roxanna EldenYou didn’t always worry about finding time for a personal life. In September, you were excited about starting the school year. In October, you were overwhelmed, and in November, you were busy wishing you’d get into a car accident on the way to work. You likely spent winter break planning a January comeback that was somewhat successful. You should be happy. Instead, as Valentine’s Day approaches, you wonder if your weekends will always revolve around planning lessons and grading papers on which four of your students didn’t even write their names. Sacrificing your personal life to the classroom may seem like a sign of dedication, but it’s more likely to lead to burnout and bad attitude. Here are some reasons work may be eclipsing your personal life, along with some tips for maintaining balance.

Beware of letting teacher habits such as micromanaging, grammar corrections, or unwarranted perkiness creep into your adult relationships.

You’ve created a teacher personality monster.

Beginning teachers work hard to be taken seriously. Once we’ve fine-tuned our teacher look and developed a convincing teacher voice, it can be tempting to stay in character. The problem is, adults don’t respond well when we treat them as if they might run with scissors. After you’ve found your teacher personality, you have to learn to turn it on and off. Think of your teacher personality as a shift between your first-name self and last-name self. Beware of letting teacher habits such as micromanaging, grammar corrections, or unwarranted perkiness creep into your adult relationships.

You can’t stop talking about the kids.

You know those people with new babies who can’t stop talking about their babies? New teachers have these tendencies too — except it’s as if

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